Wednesday, August 11, 2010

the woods are alive!


Mr. B pointed across a field the other day and told me, "That's my favorite tree in the whole world because I think it looks like a monster."

Now every time I look at a weeping willow, I see this:

That made me think of how when I was young I'd see the sparkling snow under the moonlight and imagine a faerie's ball was taking place beneath the piles of flakes. The sparkles were their tiny chandeliers and glittering gowns.

Spill it, reader. What magic did you see in nature as a child?

13 comments:

  1. Remember when Santa was "real" - I love that magic

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  2. Very cool tree.
    When I was young, I practically lived at this incredible creek that wandered through our neighborhood. You couldn't see it from any road. You had to hike through woods and down a steep hill to get to it. We spent summers "churning butter" and building forts and discovering mysteries, like caves and shells of old trees, and whirlpools.

    Now that I'm a mom, I wish I could have given this to my kids. It's hard to believe that I'd stay gone for hours and hours and my mom didn't know exactly where I was. Times are so different now. I let my youngest play by the river, but only with a friend, and with a cell phone in his pocket. I still get nervous about it though.

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  3. I love the Muppets! My daughter imagined the "color things" when she was little. At first they were scary; then she made them friends. It took us months to realize she was talking about the bright colors in your eyes after looking at a camera flash or bright sunlight.

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  4. Oh, my. Gross as it is, the only thing that comes to mind (off the top of my head) is smashing anything that creeped on many legs and leaving them at doorways so other insects would see my handiwork and be warned away.

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  5. I remember picking little berries off the bush and mixing them with 'helicopters' in the sandbox and 'cooking'.

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  6. I don't remember thinking of magic, but whenever we were camping or hiking I would think about what it was like to be the first pioneer that walked across that land. Mindboggling.

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  7. I absolutely believed that the cats in our neighborhood had a league where they'd get together, lounge around in club chairs, read newspapers and generally shoot the breeze before joining their families again in the evening.

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  8. I wasn't a child, but I remember the magic, 7 years ago when I moved into our house, the blinking of the fireflies. We didn't have them in Green Bay, so when I moved out here and Farmer pointed them out, they seemed magical. They still do.

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  9. I also agree with Jenn @ Juggling Life....the thought of Lewis and Clark, or more close to home, Marquette and Joliet, being the first Europeans to sail down the Fox River stuns me every time. I can't imagine what that would be like. It gives me shivers.

    It's also what helped me to become a History teacher. It's just fascinating.

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  10. Love, love, love playing this game. A large weeping willow in my backyard was perfect for me to play Tarzan in. Sure, I'd strip all the leaves off as I swung around but it was awesome. I guess the tomboy in me loved being in trees imagining being on the crow's nest of a tall pirate ship. I could go on and on. Now that I'm grown I imagine fairies.

    And yes, I am in counseling.

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  11. I used to sit under weeping willows and think it was a secret fort, like no one could see me in there.

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  12. When I would visit my dad and go to the ocean, I believed in mermaids and hoped I would see one someday. (The movie "The Little Mermaid" probably contributed...hehe)

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  13. I grew up with two willows; hate 'em. We had to pick up their destruction every week so Dad could mow the lawn - sucked. Mr Blarney wants one but I refuse on the grounds of "I will not clean up it's mess."
    Anywho ~ magical would have to be the turn of winter to spring. Even now watching the new growth each morning is worth getting up early for.

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Spill it, reader.