Friday, March 8, 2013

women

It's International Women's Day today and I just got done cleaning out the second drawer of my old teaching files.  I was a bit demoralized to discover that many articles I'd clipped and cartoons about gender issues I'd saved still seem very relevant almost a decade later.  Most of you can think of a hundred policy changes to empower women off the top of your head, but what are you doing in your everyday life? 


*sigh*

 Like all good, respectable feminists, I vote, donate to charitable causes like Heifer International that directly address the plight of women in poverty around the world, make it a point to complement the little girls I know on the things they do instead of how they look.  I regularly explain to my sons why certain images are offensive to women because they objectify their bodies, and try to instill in them a particular value about women as people and partners.  I try to teach them about the awesome things women have done, because they already get a clear message about what men have accomplished.  I support women-owned and operated businesses.   I try to fret less about how I look and more about what I accomplish.  I read, engage in healthy and respectful debate about issues like contraception and the work-family balance, and I ignore most of the media's attempts to influence my attitude about my value.  (I mean, I won't dye my hair or get Botox injections, but I have bought some eye cream and a pair of Spanx ...)

Spill it, reader.  What are you doing to celebrate and empower women in your neck of the woods?  Are we gaining ground as a representative half of the world's population?  Do you believe the whole conceit of a day celebrating women is outdated, silly, unnecessary or more vital than ever before?

12 comments:

  1. Well, you've educated me. I didn't even know it was International Women's Day.

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  2. In this very civilized and modern thinking country that I live in, women still only earn 55 cents for every Euro a man earns. I think there's a lot of work left to do right here. Where's the outrage?

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  3. I hope I am a good role model in the classroom for my female students, and that I am raising a daughter to be a strong feminist.

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  4. This is hard to answer. I hope I raised my daughter to be a strong woman. Even more, I hope I raised my son to see women as strong people.

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  5. I still believe IWD is necessary. Unfortunately.

    I am definitely raising my girls to be feminists.

    And you saw on my blog today what tiny little role I've taken in the battle.

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  6. I have to admit, I initially thought "International Women's Day" was a joke. Umm ... shouldn't every day be women's day?

    I'm not old enough to be this tired that this shit (income inequality, violence, general objectification of all flavors) is still going on.

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  7. I think that in addition to the things I do in my personal life, I talk directly to the female adult children I prepare for jobs, that they MUST talk about money. You don't get what you don't ask for. Period. Men get it because they ask. It's not women's fault they are conditioned by society not to talk about money or "sell" themselves, but they are the only ones that can change it. It's beautiful to see it happen.

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  8. I don't think I'm doing much to empower women. But I did notice that when I had my medical procedure yesterday, the entire team, including the doctor, were women. Progress, maybe?

    We've been watching episodes from the first season of the "West Wing" and they mentioned assault weapons, women's rights, and racism as issues of the day. Plus ca change, plus c'est la meme chose.

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  9. Hum...empowering women, I'm not sure what I've done . . . other than being a mother.

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  10. You don't dye your hair? Jealous.
    If I didn't dye my hair, I would be setting women backwards in time with the mess going on with my gray hair...

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Spill it, reader.